John_Wendi01

In the fall of 2007, my wife and I received a phone call that would change our lives forever.

We were months away from celebrating our tenth wedding anniversary. We had been undergoing infertility treatments and trying to have a baby for nearly five years. We were beginning to believe our dream of parenthood would never come true. We had cried and prayed and begged God. We had spent money, visited doctors, and researched every avenue available.

We were running out of hope.

And then we received that call from the flower girl in our wedding. She was now seventeen and pregnant, and she wanted us to be the parents of her little boy.

Wendi and I were scared. We were scared that she might change her mind. We were scared that we wouldn’t really feel like his parents. We were nervous about an “open” adoption. We had many reservations. But we wanted to be parents with every fiber of our being.

So we said yes.

On May 7, 2008 we received another phone call, and just a few hours later we were holding our little Isaac John in the hospital nursery for the very first time.

Our lives would never be the same.

Wendi and I were high school sweethearts. We had a fantastic marriage. We were best friends. But Isaac was able to complete a part of us that would otherwise have always been missing: parenthood. Sharing the responsibility, laughter, fatigue, joys, and messy moments of parenthood has united us like nothing else could.

Six weeks after Isaac was born, Wendi discovered she was eight weeks pregnant with no infertility treatments at all. Elijah Luke came into this world on January 31, 2009.

It was after having Elijah that Wendi and I were fully able to understand the miracle of adoption. We knew we had a completely selfless love for Isaac. But when we added Elijah to our family, we were able to confirm that the love for Isaac was identical to the love we had for our biological son. There was absolutely no difference.

The truth is that none of our early reservations about adoption mattered at all. It didn’t matter that Isaac had a birth family that shared in his life. It didn’t matter that we had to wait forty-eight hours to assure that he would join our family. It didn’t matter that Wendi didn’t carry him in her womb. Isaac was our little boy.

We realized that we were the lucky ones. It felt unfair that just because we were financially able to afford the costs, we got to be parents while someone else who deserved it just as much did not.

We hope to adopt again one day. We believe in it that much. But right now, our passion is trying to help other couples experience the miracle that we were so incredibly fortunate to experience.

We hope you will consider joining with us in our mission.

John Kitsteiner